Museum

African American Museum History Project

churchThe Sourland Conservancy and the Stoutsburg Cemetery Association have partnered to create an African American Museum in the Sourland Mountains.  The purpose of this museum is to create awareness and educate the general public about the African American residents who lived in this region. We want people to know about who lived here in this very unique community, how many rose up from slavery to be men and women whose labor helped create one of the wealthiest areas in Central New Jersey.  The Sourland Conservancy and the Stoutsburg Assocation are proud to partner on this wonderful opportunity to educate the public about the rich legacy of these individuals.

We are calling for anyone who may have documents, pictures or artifacts that would be of particular interest to loan to the museum.  Please note any person or family who contribute will be properly acknowledged by a plaque next to the object.

We are calling for anyone who may have documents, pictures or artifacts that would be of particular interest to loan to the museum.  Please note any person or family who contribute will be properly acknowledged by a plaque next to the object.

In collaboration with the Sourland Conservancy, the Stoutsburg Cemetery Association has released an RFP to commission sculptors for the African American Museum.  Interested parties please click here to view the RFP.

Contact Elaine Buck at 609-466-9345 or Beverly Mills, 609-737-0859.

The historic Mt. Zion AME Church on Hollow Road in Skillman, NJ is the future site of central NJ’s first African American History Museum.

Special thanks to the Stoutsburg Cemetery Association for presenting to our 8th Grade Class. Their shared stories, memoirs, and other primary sources regarding the 18th Century African American experience in the Hopewell area helped bring to life the Civil War and Civil Rights curricula we teach. We believe that our students understand the rich history that exist right in their own backyards, but few realize that history through the perspective of the African American residents.

Dr. Rosetta Treece, Principal Timberlane Middle School, Hopewell, NJ